Eric Klinenberg

Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone

Eric Klinenberg

Talk: Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone

In 1950, only 22 percent of American adults were single. Today, more than 50 percent of American adults are single and 31 million live alone. People who live alone make up 28 percent of all U.S. households, which makes them more common than any other domestic unit, including the nuclear family. In “Going Solo”, renowned sociologist and author Eric Klinenberg proves that these numbers are more than just a passing trend. They are evidence of the biggest demographic shift since the Baby Boom: we are learning to go solo, and crafting new ways of living in the process. He explores the dramatic rise of solo living and examines the seismic impact it's having on our culture, business, and politics.

Eric Klinenberg

Eric Klinenberg is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University. He is the author of Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone (The Penguin Press, 2012) and other works. He is also the author of scholarly work and journal articles in sociology.

Going Solo: The Extraordinary Rise and Surprising Appeal of Living Alone

A revelatory examination of the most significant demographic shift since the Baby Boom—the sharp increase in the number of people who live alone—that offers surprising insights on the benefits of this epochal change.

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